Glass Menagerie Book Length Bibliography

After O'Neill, Williams is perhaps the best dramatist the United States has yet produced. Born in his grandfather's rectory in Columbus, Mississippi, Williams and his family later moved to St. Louis. There Williams endured many bad years caused by the abuse of his father and his own anguish over his introverted sister, who was later permanently institutionalized. Williams attended the University of Missouri, and, after time out to clerk for a shoe company and for his own mental breakdown, also attended Washington University of St. Louis and the University of Iowa, from which he graduated in 1938. Williams began to write plays in 1935. During 1943 he spent six months as a contract screenwriter for MGM but produced only one script, The Gentleman Caller. When MGM rejected it, Williams turned it into his first major success, The Glass Menagerie (1945). In this intensely autobiographical play, Williams dramatizes the story of Amanda, who dreams of restoring her lost past by finding a gentleman caller for her crippled daughter, and of Amanda's son Tom, who longs to escape from the responsibility of supporting his mother and sister. After The Glass Menagerie,Williams wrote his masterpiece, A Streetcar Named Desire, (1947), along with a steady stream of other plays, among them such major works as Summer and Smoke(1948), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1954), and Suddenly Last Summer (1958). His plays celebrate the "fugitive kind," the sensitive outcasts whose outsider status allows them to perceive the horror of the world and who often give additional witness to that horror by becoming its victims. Stephen S. Stanton has summed up Williams's "virtues and strengths" as "a genius for portraiture, particularly of women, a sensitive ear for dialogue and the rhythms of natural speech, a comic talent often manifesting itself in "black comedy,' and a genuine theatrical flair exhibited in telling stage effects attained through lighting, costume, music, and movements." After The Night of the Iguana (1961), Williams continued to write profusely---and constantly to revise his work---but it became more difficult to get productions of his plays and, if they were produced, to win critical or popular acclaim for them. Williams won the Pulitzer Prize for drama for A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. He won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for these two and for The Glass Menagerie and The Night of the Iguana.

"[I]s an important new resource for students and scholars of Tennessee Williams at all levels of study....The book's format makes it difficult to determine which section is best. They are all good....Kolin has, once again, succeeded in demonstrating the significance of America's (and the South's) most important playwright to American scholarship. All the authors of this new volume have contributed significantly to the current renaissance of interest in Tenest in Tennessee Williams. This is an excellent and useful resource for surther study which no college or university library should be without. For the serious Williams student, it is essential."-South Atlantic Review

"25o respectable library (or Williams scholar) will want to be without this comprehensive research tool....excellent."-Modern Drama

"I recommend Kolin's Guide to Research and Performance for anyone either casually interested in or seriously engaged with Williams's work."-Mississippi Quarterly

"Philip C. Kolin's survey of critical responses should find a receptive readership....The book offers a stimulating review of interpretations of most of the plays, supplemented by chapters on William's fiction, poetry, and films."-Theatre Journal

"This volume should prove to be a worthy addition to collection of criticism of modern America drama as well as theater and performance. It presents 22 essays, which review individual and collective works of this major playwright, bringing together a lot of information....For its scope, quality, and style, the work is noteworthy among the vast array of literary criticism published in a reference format."-ARBA

"The book is an essential first tool for anyone who undertakes serious study of Williams's work, whether from the literary or the theatrical side....Perhaps most importantly for a volume of this kind, it is trustworthy. The editing, a daunting task even for one of Kolin's considerable experience, is nearly perfect. This is a major contribution to the study of Tennessee Williams, current and future."-The Southern Quarterly

"ÝN¨o respectable library (or Williams scholar) will want to be without this comprehensive research tool....excellent."-Modern Drama

"ÝI¨s an important new resource for students and scholars of Tennessee Williams at all levels of study....The book's format makes it difficult to determine which section is best. They are all good....Kolin has, once again, succeeded in demonstrating the significance of America's (and the South's) most important playwright to American scholarship. All the authors of this new volume have contributed significantly to the current renaissance of interest in Tenest in Tennessee Williams. This is an excellent and useful resource for surther study which no college or university library should be without. For the serious Williams student, it is essential."-South Atlantic Review

?25o respectable library (or Williams scholar) will want to be without this comprehensive research tool....excellent.?-Modern Drama

?I recommend Kolin's Guide to Research and Performance for anyone either casually interested in or seriously engaged with Williams's work.?-Mississippi Quarterly

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